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FLOODS DEVASTATED SOUTH CAROLINA FARMS

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FLOODS DEVASTATED SOUTH CAROLINA FARMS

Post by Harry on Sun Nov 15, 2015 5:18 pm


Floods Devastated South Carolina Farms

Posted: Nov 12, 2015 11:46 AM CST

Updated: Nov 12, 2015 2:50 PM CST


November 12, 2015

NASHVILLE, Tenn (RFDTV) - After the historic flood and continued rain in South Carolina, farmers need help. Many fields have been turned into ponds and some crops aren't even worth harvesting. On Myra Ardis' family farm in Elloree, cotton and peanuts are still in shambles. "We could not pay the cost of running a machine through the field with what we would get paid with the deduction on these nuts," says Ardis.

You don't have to look hard to spot the effects of the October flood and the other rains afterward. Peanuts are molding, the cotton is ugly, and most fields are still too swampy for heavy equipment. Only two modules of cotton have been harvested, and right now, they can't go anywhere.

"It's going to stick to the ground when we pick it up when we get a truck in here to pick it up," says farmer Rhett Weeks. "Rain runs off this tarp and wets the corner, and that just spreads through the module, and it'll get hot and start decomposing."

"It's the worst cotton season I've ever seen," adds Weeks, "and I've been in and around the cotton business since I was almost 20 years."

The South Carolina Department of Agriculture wants farmers with flood damage to contact their crop insurance adjustors, reach out to FEMA for property damage, and then fill out a damage assessment with Clemson University. That data will be taken to Congress for potential emergency funds for farmers.

"The earliest estimates were $300 million of losses," says Martin Eubanks the Assistant Commissioner with the South Carolina Department of Agriculture. "We expect that to go up if we see this continued rainfall." Eubanks goes on to add "Without federal assistance, it could easily change the face of agriculture in our state over the next several years."

Some farmers are worried about how to make ends meet until the funds are available. The State Department of Ag wants to remind all farmers to fill out the assessment as soon as possible.

Story provided by Emery Glover of NBC.

Harry
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